The House of Commons held indicative votes tonig

first_imgThe House of Commons held ‘indicative votes’ tonight, which saw MPs vote at 7pm on a series of Brexit options with the aim of identifying how best to break the parliamentary deadlock.Labour whipped MPs to support motions: (J), advocating customs union membership; (K), Labour’s Brexit plan; and (M), endorsing a “confirmatory public vote” on any deal (D).The leadership also “encouraged support” for motion D, put forward by the cross-party group Common Market 2.0, which backs plans for a Norway-style arrangement including single market membership.Shadow cabinet members Andrew Gwynne, Ian Lavery and Jon Trickett defied the Labour whip and abstained on Margaret Beckett’s motion for another referendum. There has been no sign so far that they will be forced to resign.Melanie Onn quit as a shadow housing minister to vote against Beckett’s motion.Labour backbenchers Ronnie Campbell, Kate Hoey and Dennis Skinner voted in favour of a no deal Brexit.Vote resultsJohn Baron’s no deal motion (B): Ayes 160 – Noes 400 (defeated by 240)Nick Boles’ Common Market 2.0 motion (D): Ayes 188 – Noes 283 (defeated by 95)George Eustice’s EFTA and EEA motion (H): Ayes 65 – Noes 377 (defeated by 312)Kenneth Clarke’s customs union motion (J): Ayes 264 – Noes 272 (defeated by eight)Jeremy Corbyn’s Brexit motion (K): Ayes 237 – Noes 307 (defeated by 70)Joanna Cherry’s revocation motion (L): Ayes 184 – Noes 293 (defeated by 109)Margaret Beckett’s public vote motion (M): Ayes 268 – Noes 295 (defeated by 27)Marcus Fysh’s preferential arrangements motion (O): Ayes 139 – Noes 422 (defeated by 283)Labour rebelsKenneth Clarke’s motion (J)AGAINST: Ronnie Campbell, Ann Clwd, Jim Cunningham, Stephen Hepburn, Kate Hoey, John Mann, Siobhain McDonagh, Anna McMorrin, Grahame Morris, Dennis Skinner, Graham Stringer, Paul Williams.ABSTAINED: Caroline Flint, David Lammy, Owen Smith, Jo Stevens, Daniel Zeichner.Jeremy Corbyn’s motion (K)AGAINST: Ronnie Campbell, Ann Clwyd, Stephen Hepburn, Siobhain McDonagh.ABSTAINED: Kevin Barron, Kate Hoey, Ian Murray, Owen Smith, Jo Stevens, Graham Stringer, Daniel Zeichner.Margaret Beckett’s motion (M)AGAINST: Kevin Barron, Ronnie Campbell, Sarah Champion, Rosie Cooper, Jon Cruddas, Jim Fitzpatrick, Caroline Flint, Yvonne Fovargue, Stephen Hepburn, Mike Hill, Kate Hoey, Dan Jarvis, Helen Jones, Kevan Jones, Emma Lewell-Buck, Justin Madders, John Mann, Grahame Morris, Melanie Onn, Stephanie Peacock, Dennis Skinner, Ruth Smeeth, Laura Smith, Gareth Snell, John Spellar, Graham Stringer, Derek Twigg.ABSTAINED: Tracy Brabin, Julie Cooper, Judith Cummins, Gloria De Piero, Chris Evans, Mary Glindon, Andrew Gwynne, Carolyn Harris, Mike Kane, Stephen Kinnock, Ian Lavery, Liz McInnes, Jim McMahon, Ian Mearns, Lisa Nandy, Jo Platt, Paula Sheriff, Jon Trickett.Motion (D): Common Market 2.0This was not a whipped vote, but MPs were advised to support the motion. The following MPs chose to vote against:Rosena Allin-Khan, Tonia Antoniazzi, Kevin Barron, Ruth Cadbury, Ronnie Campbell, Sarah Champion, Ann Clwyd, Rosie Cooper, Neil Coyle, Emma Dent Coad, Louise Ellman, Jim Fitzpatrick, Caroline Flint, Stephen Hepburn, Kate Hoey, Kevan Jones, Karen Lee, Clive Lewis, John Mann, Rachael Maskell, Christian Matheson, Kerry McCarthy, Siobhan McDonagh, Anna McMorrin, Madeleine Moon, Stephen Morgan, Graham Morris, Kate Osamor, Lloyd Russell-Moyle, Tulip Siddiq, Dennis Skinner, Ruth Smeeth, Laura Smith, Owen Smith, Gareth Snell, John Spellar, Jo Stevens, Graham Stringer, Derek Twigg, Thelma Walker, Paul Williams, Daniel Zeichner.Tags:Brexit /brexit votes /Indicative votes /last_img read more

Venezuelas Guaido urges troops to unite against Maduro violence erupts

first_img Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, speaks with a military member near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Manaure Quintero An opposition supporter waves a Venezuelan flag near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, is seen outside Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Soldiers take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins People react to tear gas near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Soldiers are seen inside the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” as an opposition supporter takes cover, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, shakes hands with a military member near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Opposition supporters take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, talks to supporters in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins A military member throws a tear gas canister near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Opposition demonstrators throw rocks on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, talks to supporters in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, talks to supporters in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia RawlinsVenezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, talks to supporters in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins CARACAS (Reuters) – Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido on Tuesday made his strongest call yet to the military to help him oust President Nicolas Maduro, and violence broke out at anti-government protests as the country hit a new crisis point after years of political and economic chaos.Several dozen armed troops accompanying Guaido clashed with soldiers supporting Maduro at a rally outside the La Carlota air base in Caracas, but the incident fizzled out and did not appear to be part of an immediate attempt by the opposition to take power through military force.Guaido, in Twitter posts, wrote that he had begun the “final phase” of his campaign to topple Maduro, calling on Venezuelans and the armed forces to back him ahead of May Day mass street protests planned for Wednesday.“The moment is now!” he wrote. “The future is ours: the people and Armed Forces united to put an end” to Maduro’s time in office. People react to tear gas near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Military members stand guard near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Opposition demonstrators gather on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino Soldiers and people react to the sound of gunfire near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins People react as military members walk past near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Manaure Quintero NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVEScenter_img An opposition demonstrator throws back a tear gas canister on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino Tens of thousands of people were marching in Caracas in support of Guaido on Tuesday, clashing with riot police along the main Francisco Fajardo thoroughfare. A National Guard armoured car slammed into protesters who were throwing stones and hitting the vehicle.Defence Minister Vladimir Padrino called the latest instability a “coup movement” but several hours after Guaido’s announcement there was no sign of any other anti-Maduro military activity. Guaido later left a rally he was holding with military supporters at the air base.Doctor Maggi Santi of the Salud Chacao health centre in eastern Caracas said there were 36 people injured in Tuesday’s incidents, most of them hit with pellets or rubber bullets.Repeated opposition attempts to force Maduro, a socialist, from power through huge protests and calls on the military to act have so far failed.Maduro, a former bus driver who took office after the death of political mentor President Hugo Chavez in 2013, said on Tuesday he had spoken with military leaders and that they had shown him “their total loyalty.”“Nerves of steel!” Maduro wrote on Twitter. “I call for maximum popular mobilization to assure the victory of peace. We will win!”The move was Guaido’s boldest effort yet to persuade the military to rise up against Maduro. If it fails, it could be seen as evidence that he lacks the support he says he has. It might also encourage the authorities, who have already stripped him of parliamentary immunity and opened multiple investigations into him, to arrest him.The United States is among some 50 countries that recognise Guaido as Venezuela’s president, and has imposed sanctions to try to dislodge Maduro, who they say won re-election last year through fraud.“Whatever happens now, we won’t let ourselves be stopped. Our process is moving on step by step, in accordance with our constitution. We continue to stand for nonviolence,” Guaido told German international broadcaster Deutsche Welle in an interview released on Tuesday.Oil prices topped $73, partly driven higher by the uncertainty in Venezuela, an OPEC member whose oil exports have been hit by U.S. sanctions and an economic crisis.Guaido’s efforts appeared aimed at building momentum towards the May Day mass street protests and making them a turning point in his push to oust Maduro.Guaido has said Wednesday’s protests will be the largest march in Venezuela’s history and part of the “definitive phase” of his effort to take office in order to call fresh elections.TRUMP BRIEFEDVenezuela is mired in a deep economic crisis despite its vast oil reserves. Shortages of food and medicine have prompted more than 3 million Venezuelans to emigrate in recent years.The slump has worsened this year with large areas of territory left in the dark for days at a time by power outages.“My mother doesn’t have medicine, my economic situation is terrible, my family has had to emigrate. We don’t earn enough money. We have no security. But we are hopeful, and I think that this is the beginning of the end of this regime,” said Jose Madera, 42, a mechanic, sitting atop his motorbike in a protest on Tuesday.Guaido, the leader of Venezuela’s opposition-controlled National Assembly, in January invoked the constitution to assume an interim presidency, arguing that Maduro’s re-election in 2018 was illegitimate.U.S. President Donald Trump “has been briefed and is monitoring the ongoing situation,” White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said on Tuesday. The White House declined to comment on whether the administration had been consulted or had advance knowledge of what Guaido was planning.Carlos Vecchio, Guaido’s envoy to the United States, told reporters in Washington that the Trump administration did not help coordinate Tuesday’s events.“No. This is a movement led by Venezuelans,” he said.But Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza, who is loyal to Maduro, blamed the United States.“This is directly planned in Washington, in the Pentagon and Department of State, and by (national security adviser John) Bolton,” Arreaza told Reuters.Bolton, a foreign policy hawk, backed Guaido’s actions on Tuesday. “The FANB must protect the Constitution and the Venezuelan people. It should stand by the National Assembly and the legitimate institutions against the usurpation of democracy,” Bolton tweeted, referring to the FANB armed forces.Brazil’s right-wing President Jair Bolsonaro expressed his nation’s solidarity for the people of Venezuela, who he said were “enslaved by a dictator.”MADURO SUPPORTMaduro has appeared to retain control of state institutions and the loyalty of senior military officers and has foreign allies such as Russia and Cuba.Russia’s foreign ministry on Tuesday accused the Venezuelan opposition of resorting to violence in what it said was a brazen attempt to draw the country’s armed forces into clashes.Maduro has called Guaido a U.S-backed puppet who seeks to oust him in a coup. The government has arrested his top aide, stripped Guaido of his parliamentary immunity and opened multiple probes. It has also barred him from leaving the country, a ban Guaido openly violated earlier this year.Guaido, in a video on his Twitter account, was accompanied by men in military uniform and opposition politician Leopoldo Lopez, who had been placed under house arrest in 2017.(Reporting by Angus Berwick, Vivian Sequera, Corina Pons, Mayela Armas, Deisy Buitrago, and Luc Cohen in Caracas; Additional reporting by Matt Spetalnick, Patricia Zengerle and Roberta Rampton in Washington; Writing by Alistair Bell; Editing by Peter Graff, Bill Rigby and Jonathan Oatis)WhatsApp An injured soldier is seen on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Opposition demonstrators take cover from tear gas on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino An opposition demonstrator is struck by a Venezuelan National Guard vehicle on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino Opposition demonstrators take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino Military members react to tear gas, near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins People react near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Manaure Quintero NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES A man waves a Venezuelan flag near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins SharePrint Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who many nations have recognised as the country’s rightful interim ruler, stands next to soldiers as they speak to the media near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins Opposition demonstrators take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino A military member and a man take cover near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Manaure Quintero NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES Venezuelan opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez talks to the media outside Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota”, in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins An opposition demonstrator is struck by a Venezuelan National Guard vehicle on a street near the Generalisimo Francisco de Miranda Airbase “La Carlota” in Caracas, Venezuela April 30, 2019. REUTERS/Ueslei Marcelino <a href=’https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG18688.jpg” alt=”last_img” /> read more

Sea Watch captain enforced human rights where EU fails Rackete arrested

first_img SharePrint The Sea-Watch 3 rescue ship docks in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane The Sea-Watch 3 rescue ship docks in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane A migrant is seen on a stretcher on deck of rescue ship Sea-Watch 3 near Lampedusa, Italy, June 28, 2019. Sea-Watch International/Handout via REUTERS <a href=’https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2023/IMG9639.jpg” alt=”center_img” /> Carola Rackete, the 31-year-old Sea-Watch 3 captain, is seen onboard the ship as it docks in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane A migrant waits to disembark from the Sea-Watch 3 as the rescue ship docks in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane Carola Rackete, the 31-year-old Sea-Watch 3 captain, is escorted off the ship by police and taken away for questioning, in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane 1 of 10 Migrants wait to disembark from the Sea-Watch 3 as the rescue ship docks in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapane Carola Rackete, the 31-year-old Sea-Watch 3 captain, is escorted off the ship by police and taken away for questioning, in Lampedusa, Italy June 29, 2019. REUTERS/Guglielmo Mangiapanelast_img read more