Former U.S. Rep. Rick Hill to Run for Governor

first_imgHELENA – Former U.S. Rep. Rick Hill made it clear Friday he will be running for governor in 2012, scheduling a formal announcement for Monday.Word of the Republican’s candidacy, long expected, comes after some of the biggest election wins seen by the GOP in years. The Republicans dominated state legislative elections, securing the biggest lead in the state House either party has had in decades.Hill retired from Congress in 1999 after two terms due to eye problems. He has since said that issue has been corrected.The 63-year-old Hill has remained engaged in the Montana Republican Party. He frequently helps run party conventions and is considered by many to be a dean of the state GOP.Hill will join a 2012 Republican field that already includes state Sens. Ken Miller, who also used to lead the state Republican Party, and Corey Stapleton. Miller ran for governor in 2004, but lost in the primary to former Secretary of State Bob Brown.A news release from Hill states he will formally declare his candidacy Monday at a Clancy timber mill.Term limits prevent Gov. Brian Schweitzer from running again. So far no Democrats have formally announced plans for the office.Hill was first elected to the House in 1996 — his first bid for elective office — when longtime Rep. Pat Williams, D-Mont., retired. Hill was re-elected in 1998, but he didn’t run as expected at the time for a third term due to the eye condition. He has since undergone surgery to fix the problem, he has said.When in office in the 1990s, Hill generally followed the GOP line in his House votes, although he sometimes bucked his party colleagues.Noteworthy votes in the House included his support for impeachment against then-President Bill Clinton, a strict line against gun control, and a vote in favor of an unsuccessful override of a presidential veto of a ban on partial-birth abortions.Hill was succeeded in Congress by current U.S. Rep. Denny Rehberg. Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. Emaillast_img read more

UK: Installation rush expected as subsidy cuts loom

first_imgUK: Installation rush expected as subsidy cuts loomFigures from Department of Energy and Climate Change reveal 59% increase in FIT-based installations from August to September, with trend expected to accelerate through to end of year. November 2, 2015 Ian Clover Installations Legal Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Official data from the U.K. government Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has revealed that the looming cuts to solar subsidy have triggered an installation rush that is forecast to accelerate through to the end of the year. In the summer DECC announced that it would be cutting support for solar under the popular feed-in tariff (FIT) by 87% for residential installations. This announcement triggered a surge in FIT-backed solar installations once the news had spread – DECC data shows that 18,346 solar systems were added under the FIT in September, up 59% on the previous month and the highest figure for three years. The Solar Trade Association (STA) has reported that its members are experiencing a significant rise in demand, prompting concerns that the rush to beat the FIT cut deadline could result in consumers accepting poorer deals or receiving shoddy workmanship as developers seek to install as many systems as they can. The chief executive of the Renewable Energy Consumer Code, Virginia Graham, has stressed that households should not fall foul of signing up for deals with hidden catches, and must be on guard against overpriced or rushed work.Such a precedent was set in 2011-12 when, Graham said, a “mad rush for solar when subsidies were last slashed resulted in a very high number of complaints because people got their fingers burnt.” According to the Renewable Energy Consumer Code, the industry code of conduct body, many homeowners back then paid over the odds or, in some cases, “paid a deposit to a company that was then unable to complete the installations in time.” Others received poorly installed systems as developers rushed and cut corners to beat the deadline. As the U.K. solar industry has matured, growing into one of the largest in the world over the past 18 months, the types of financing packages available to consumers has widened. However, Graham has warned consumers to check the terms of any leasing schemes they may be interested in, stating that some deals often require customers to sign restrictive lease agreement or give developers various rights over their property. The threat of some companies going bust in the post-cut landscape – as many as 27,000 solar jobs are at risk from January 1, 2016 when the FIT level drops – could also lead to some problems for customers, warned Leonie Greene, the STA’s head of external affairs. “It is important that anyone wanting to invest in solar takes necessary care to ensure a quality installation,” Greene said. “Solar is an exceptionally reliable investment, but it is vital that government acts quickly to secure the future of this industry, not least to ensure the necessary future care consumers expect from their local solar company.” Sudden and extreme policy changes, such as those imposed on the solar industry by DECC, will naturally spark “mighty booms followed by mighty busts”, Greene added. “What you are seeing is the panic of a closing down sale. But the last technology the U.K. government should be pulling the rug on is solar power.” REA supports storage goalsAmid the warnings, the growing appetite for solar power in the U.K. is evident in the number of installations seen over the past few months. There are more than 750,000 U.K. households with a rooftop solar PV system installed, and this transition to a more decentralized energy supply can be aided by storage technology – which is something the government is, at least, giving consideration to in the new National Infrastructure Commission (NIC) launched last week. The NIC’s three key priorities include better managing the country’s energy supply and demand, and British chancellor George Osborne has previously suggested that large-scale storage can play a pivotal role under the NIC.The Renewable Energy Association (REA) hopes to work with the NIC to support the development of storage technologies, in conjunction with the U.K.’s academic institutions, startups and innovative companies. “Storage is a critical component to the nation’s transition to a more decentralized energy supply,” said REA senior analyst Frank Gordon. “Soon communities will be able to manage much of their electricity independently and businesses will be able to better predict and insulate themselves against unpredictable energy bills. This will enable new business models in the industry and facilitate greater renewables integration. “We believe the Commission should support energy storage as a vital element of national infrastructure.” James Court, the head of policy and external affairs at the REA, said that U.K. energy consumers have shown a hunger to control their energy futures, and that the growing number of businesses, homeowners and communities seeking to produce and manage their own energy supply should be able to do so. “Energy storage is a critical component of this movement,” said Court. “It will allow for greater grid stability and will accelerate our path torwards decarbonization.”Popular content Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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Ian also reports on the UK solar market, having worked as a print and web journalist in Britain for various multimedia companies, covering topics ranging from renewable energy and sustainability to real estate, sport and film.More articles from Ian Clover [email protected] Related content The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. 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Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print ESG criteria: Should developers take notice? Michael Fuhs 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Something is brewing in the financial world. “Sustainable finance” and the growth of ESG funds have been taking the mark… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. On strong fundamentals pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The solar industry faced headwinds in March, writes Jesse Pichel of ROTH Capital Partners, thanks to rising interest rat… When quality meets quantity Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As 2021 progresses, the signs of it being (yet another) banner year for PV deployment become clearer. An increasing numb… Polysilicon from Xinjiang: a balanced view pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As of March, the United States and Europe were considering sanctions on polysilicon from Xinjiang, China, due to concerns over forced labor. Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

CBRE sells two Class-A offices for $44M in Scottsdale

first_img92 Mountain View, located at 10001 N. 92nd St. in Scottsdale.CBRE has negotiated the sale of two premier class A office buildings in the Phoenix metro area for a total consideration of $44.15 million. The sale included the ±106,931-square-foot Scottsdale Gateway I, located at 9201 E. Mountain View Rd. in Scottsdale, and the ±116,200-square-foot 92 Mountain View, located at 10001 N. 92nd St. in Scottsdale.Barry Gabel and Chris Marchildon with CBRE’s Phoenix office, along with Kevin Shannon, Ken White and Michael Moore in CBRE’s Los Angeles office, brokered the transaction between the sellers, TR Scottsdale Gateway I Corp. and TR 92 Mountain View Corp., and Equus Capital Partners, Ltd. of Los Angeles. Jenifer Ratcliffe and Erin Curry with Chicago-based LPC Realty Advisors were also involved in the transaction on behalf of the seller. Equus Capital Partners purchased the properties for a total consideration of $44.15 million.Bryan Taute with CBRE’s Phoenix office has been awarded the marketing and leasing. Equus Capital Partners has also retained CBRE to handle property management.Scottsdale Gateway I, located at 9201 E. Mountain View Rd.“We are pleased to add these two well-leased, class A office properties to our existing Scottsdale portfolio,” said Jonathan Praw, vice president and head of Equus Capital Partner’s West Coast Regional Office, who oversaw the transaction for the firm, “This investment presents the opportunity to acquire institutional grade assets at an attractive basis in a strong infill location.”“Interest in these two assets was exceptionally high given their strong leasing history. Both properties are located in a dynamic infill location and each has averaged 90 percent occupancy for the past ten years due to being surrounded by strategic economic engines such as Scottsdale Healthcare’s Shea Medical Campus and the CVS Caremark Corporate Campus,” said CBRE’s Gabel. “In addition, the properties are both in excellent condition, boast exceptional parking and are adjacent to abundant retail services and the Loop 101 Freeway.”Built in 1998, Scottsdale Gateway I is a two-story, class A office building located directly across from the ±433-bed Scottsdale Healthcare Hospital and Medical Campus. The property is 91 percent leased to five, high-quality tenants, including Matrix Medical Network, Grand Canyon University, Scottsdale Healthcare Rehabilitation Center, SimonMed Imaging and Q Vision. Each of the tenants benefits from its proximity to a major hospital and medical campus.Built in 1996, 92 Mountain View is also a two-story, class A office building with proximity to Scottsdale Healthcare Hospital and Medical Campus. The property is fully leased to CVS Caremark, the largest pharmacy healthcare provider in the United States and Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation headquarters, a group of world class medical centers within Metropolitan Phoenix.Both properties benefit from surrounding amenities including dining, shopping, golf resorts and executive housing, as well as close proximity to the Loop 101 Freeway.last_img read more

C-Capture receives accreditation from BP

first_imgC-Capture has a unique, solvent-based technology which can be deployed on most industrial processes requiring CO2 separation from other gases, including power stations, industrial plants, hydrogen production facilities, and bio- or natural gas upgrading plants.The technology uses a new class of capture solvents that are not classified as hazardous, are inexpensive, and can be manufactured on a large scale from biological sources.C-Capture’s technology uses 40% less energy consumption than current commercially available technologies and has the potential to significantly reduce the cost per tonne of CO2 capture.Tom White, CEO of C-Capture, said, “We are delighted to have received ALC accreditation from BP following a rigorous assessment.”“Due to the unique nature of our solvent, our technology is able to offer significant commercial advantages over those currently available, including lower energy requirements and avoidance of expensive construction materials.”“We are proud to be one of the companies in the BP portfolio playing a role in a crucial area and supporting its net zero ambition.”last_img read more

Thompson out on his own

first_imgIPGC Pattaya Golf Society at The Links BarMonday, Sept. 21, Bangpra – StablefordThe new week started for the Pattaya Golf Society with a trip to Bangpra to play a stableford competition on the well prepared course.A quick look at the weather forecast showed a thunderstorm at 9 a.m. and another at 4 p.m. and the golf gods obviously endorsed the meteorologists’ opinion and the group managed to play the round with no problems.  So what, then, was the reason for the generally low scores?  Fairways were good and greens were their usual testing best, there was a light breeze and the field was in good fettle.  Hmm…Stuart Thompson. There were no birdie ‘2’s and third place was shared by Jesper Hansen, Murray Edwards, Petri Takkunen and Andrew Purdie all with 27 points.  In second were Alan Flynn and Erik Anttonen with 29 points each but the winner Stuart Thompson was a full six points ahead after another solid round by the Australian golfer.The consolation beer went to John O’Sullivan and the Booby Bevy went to newest member Keith Boxshall, to mark his low score on his debut.  In reality it could have been awarded to many in the field after a rare torrid day at Bangpra.Wednesday, Sept. 16, Greenwood A & C (white tees) – Stableford1st David Thomas (9) 34ptsT2nd Craig Thomas (14) 33ptsT2nd Phil McClure (25) 33ptsThe big question on everyone’s mind was would we play today?  The huge storm that we were warned about duly arrived in Pattaya on Tuesday night, leaving many wondering about the prospect for golf the following day.  So it was a small but optimistic party that headed out on to the motorway, and into the gloom of gathering clouds on Wednesday morning.We arrived at a largely deserted golf course and prepared for our 10:15 tee time.  Whilst overcast, the weather looked to be holding, and hold it did.  In fact the course stayed dry until we reached C7, our 16th, at which point the heavens opened.  After ten minutes, it cleared but returned with a vengeance ten minutes later.  With just two holes to play, we soldiered on and amazingly, we played the last hole in perfectly fine and sunny weather.Carts were not permitted on fairways, which invoked our preferred lie rule.  Even though it wasn’t raining, the fairways were very wet and drives stopped where they landed, offering no run whatsoever.  Notwithstanding, the course was still eminently playable, with greens offering true and consistent run.No ‘2’s today, which preserved what would be a modest winner’s pot.  There is no doubt that the heavy rain, which effected play on our 16th and 17th holes, did leave its mark on scores.  Tied in second place on 33 points were the Aussie pairing of Phil McClure and Craig Thomas, only a point behind the day’s winner, David Thomas.Back at the Links, the lucky beer draw went to Peter Dunsmore, whilst no one from amongst our two groups did anything silly enough to warrant the booby bevy.  The day finished with most of us believing we got lucky; lucky that we were not rained off.  We pondered this whilst sipping our beers, watching water levels rise at an alarming rate in Soi Buakhao.  Some storm, but thankfully we got our golf in.last_img read more

Seniors share sauna success

first_imgIPGC Pattaya Golf Society at The Links BarPhew!  It ain’t ‘alf hot!  Pattaya Golf Society members took to the tee at Pleasant Valley on Monday, 2nd May with that thought firmly in their minds and the ways in which they could make a stableford round more tolerable and enjoyable.The course was in fine condition with green fairways and consistent, if a little tricky, greens.  Pleasant Valley was well populated, being a public holiday but the group managed to finish within just over four hours.Results saw Murray Edwards and Brian Talbot sharing third place with 30 pints and two other seniors in the field, Aussie Alan Walker and Mr Len shared the win with 31 points each.  The par threes are all a different challenge at Pleasant Valley and the heat/breeze/lethargy all conspired to dismiss the possibility of a birdie ‘2’ being recorded. Jeff Hunt, second in the previous competition found his new driver was suffering in the conditions and found his low score of the day aimed the Booby Bevy in his direction.It was hard work on the day in uncomfortable conditions but a pleasant course, well turned out was a bonus for the group.Fine win for FlynnAnother steamy Wednesday on 4th May saw the Pattaya Golf Society visit Khao Kheow to play a stableford competition on the B and A nines which gave the impression of being in good condition.  True, fairways were green but in reality they were very dry with anaemic grass lying on top of sand and dust.  A sad symptom of the current drought.  Greens however were quite consistent.  The light breeze offered some relief to the incessant waves of heat however.The competition saw John O’Sullivan and Paul Magowan share third place with 28 points whilst Mike King held on to second place with 29 points, which included a birdie ‘2’ on the signature hole, B8.  The day’s winner was Kiwi Alan Flynn and an excellent front nine, which saw two birdie ‘2’s on the B par threes, gave way to a languid back nine which saw him record a total of 31 points.Khao Kheow had been a tough call, as with many other courses in the current conditions.Cooper high and dryOn Friday, 6th May the Pattaya Golf Society visited Mountain Shadow to play a stableford competition on a yellowed and dry course where the lack of rain has left dusty fairways, albeit with some more run than could be expected.  Greens were good however but solid iron play was more of a priority than good putting on the hard fairways.A moderate field saw Aussie Mike Firkin enjoy his first round this trip with a third place finish with 31 points and John O’Sullivan take second with 33 points.  The winner was Mark Cooper whose round was of unarguable quality.  Thirty eight points in conditions such as those was a prodigious effort and he deserved the plaudits of the field back at the presentation in the Links.There were no birdie ‘2’s and the Booby Bevy went to old soldier Alan Walker, so consistent usually, who this time managed a round with ten points on the front and fifteen on the back.  All his tee shots hit the fairway but then …what was I saying about iron play?PGS golfers in quiet moments will be praying for rain over the weekend as many, if not most courses are suffering in the current drought. It’s no longer the fun it should be.last_img read more

A Brooker through and through

first_imgMatt O’Neil is a Brooker, through and through. He’s seen the highs and lows of the Gembrook Football Netball Club…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

Park visitors urged to stay on track

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS BUSHWALKERS are being urged to stick Emerald Lake Park’s dedicated paths after fears that their unofficial routes…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img